Friday, April 13, 2012

Brain Fogging

When I think about what I have been doing for the last few days – it has definitely been brain fogging.  I have started to use brain fog as a verb because I am certainly not doing anything else that involves using my mind particularly well.  The Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation describes brain fog as the following:


Brain Fog is a lay term to describe fluctuating mild memory loss that is inappropriate for a person’s age. It may include forgetfulness, spaciness, confusion, decreased ability to pay 
attention, an inability to focus, and difficulty in processing information.

For me, I describe it as feeling like there is cotton in my head that I am trying to push through to no avail.  I knew today would be a challenge when I left my purse that contained my credit cards, money, medicine etc. at the neighborhood coffee shop for over two hours without realizing it was gone.  Luckily, some wonderful person turned it in to the manager and nothing was stolen.  Phew!  So I decided to try and combat the fog by going a on a walk to see if that would get my mind working, but despite my best efforts the fog was still present.

On brain fogging weeks and days, I often find it helpful to keep myself organized by making lists of the priority items that I really need to get done so I don't forget anything important.  Non-essential tasks can wait.  Besides that, I just try to roll with the fogginess, not put too much pressure on myself, and move forward with my day the best that I can and look forward to it LIFTING.  Because I know that it eventually will.

How do you get through those brain fog days?  Do tell!


4 comments:

  1. Brain fog is for me when I talk, and before the end of what I was sayinf I can't remember the beginning of the sentence. A bad sign that I'm really tired and should take rest NOW !

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, that happens to me too. Sometimes it can be a little embarrassing. My husband will kindly say "stay with it" and help me remember.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm not sure how to get through brain fog days, but they are starting to get embarrassing. 2 weeks ago I went to the gym. I changed my shoes, took my water bottle and book out of my gym bag, and put the bag into the locker, as I do every time I've gone there for the past 3 months. Usually I put the key on my water bottle and go on about my workout. This day, something happened, but I don't know what. I put my bag in the locker, and that's all I know. I locked it (I only know this because it was locked when I went back to it, not because I remember locking it), but when I was ready to leave, there was no key on the water bottle or on the bike machine. I had, and still have absolutely no clue what happened to that key. It isn't even as if I can say, 'last thing I remember was putting it on the bench...' There is no memory of anything. My brain was completely blank, as if I had blacked out. After almost an hour of looking in the same places over and over again (it's a small gym), the woman on duty was nice enough to hunt down the owner on his cell phone to find out if there were spare keys, and thankfully there were. I felt so bad about losing it and causing so much trouble. In the times I've gone since then, I've been so deliberate about putting the key somewhere on my person, making sure I'm touching it or saying out loud what I'm doing with it or I just avoid using the lockers at all. I'm 30 years old. I'm too young for this. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I completely understand how it feels when your mind goes completely blank and you can't find something. It is hard not to get frustrated with yourself. I try and do the same thing you mentioned with your gym key -- saying to myself where I am putting something. Sometimes I even write it down on a piece of a paper in a small notebook that I carry with me because the act of writing it helps me remember things and then I can always go back to it.

    ReplyDelete